AUGUST 10 UPDATE:

The search for a missing boater in Whitney Point enters its fourth day today, August 10, as efforts on Monday again failed to find the man.

New York State Police now say the kayaker who went missing on Whitney Point Lake over the weekend is from Lousiana, not Pennsylvania.

At around 8 a.m. on Monday, August 9, authorities with the State Police Underwater Recovery Team resumed the search for 57-year-old James Jones. The man’s kayak capsized on Saturday, August 7 as he was paddling with another person. The craft was recovered but Jones did not resurface.

Searchers from several agencies, including Broome and Chenango Sheriff’s, K-9 units, fire departments, and volunteers as well as drones combed the lake and shoreline late Saturday, Sunday, and Monday to no avail.

The search was expected to resume Tuesday morning.

A source with the State Police said it was important to find the man to offer a resolution for his family.  The circumstances surrounding the accident are also under investigation.

ORIGINAL STORY:

Searchers from several agencies were searching Dorchester Lake for a kayaker who had been reported missing.

According to a statement released by the Broome County Office of Emergency Services early Sunday afternoon, divers from the New York State Police and Broome County technical rescue team were involved in the search.

The statement indicated the kayaker was reported missing Saturday evening.

The incident happened about one-half mile upstream from Dorchester Park in the town of Triangle.

Although it did not occur within the park, emergency crews were using the park for their operations.

State police said the missing person was a 57-year-old man from Pennsylvania. He was kayaking with another person when his kayak tipped over. His kayak was found but he did not resurface.

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Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com or (607) 772-8400 extension 233.  For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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