This past winter was a doozy as they say. The greater BInghamton area received more snow than most places in New York State and even the Eastern US region. As we plowed though winter, our thoughts were on the upcoming spring and summer with hopes of warm temperatures and plenty of sunshine.

Well, the warm temperatures are here and we've enjoyed summer days, but for some reason, Mother Nature has blessed us with a lot of rain and some really nasty storms causing damage and flooding in several areas in the Southern Tier of New York and Northeastern Pennsylvania.

The alerts of severe thunderstorms and possible tornado activity is enough to rattle anyone. Especially since we've experienced major flooding twice in this young century - 2006 and 2011. Both times, our area experienced major damage including homes, schools and businesses.

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Even though the 2011 flood was almost 10 years ago, I think many of us still have that fear of a return when we expedience severe thunderstorm activity like we've had ove rthe past week. During the 2011 flood, my wife, Greyhounds and I were at camp in Bradford County, Pennsylvania.

The campground is high on a hill, so we were not affected by flooding, but we couldn't get off the hill to return home. I tried routes, including dirt roads in every direction to return, but ran into roadblocks including washed out roads, bridges and debris across the road, making it impossible to get around.

Power was out at my home, so we asked my wife's sister to stop by, grad what was in the refrigerator and take it back to her home. Thankfully she had power at her home and was able to get to our home with no issues.

We were able to find a backroad way to get home a few days later, and were fortunate that our home was not flooded. Many in our area did not have that kind of luck in flood of September 2011. Take a look at these pictures and videos from the 2011 flood below. Let's hope we don't experience it again.

The Flood Of 2011

THEN AND NOW: See the Evolution of the Southern Tier

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