If you're freaked out by the birds you see everyday when you're out and about, then great news (maybe not)!. The "world's most dangerous bird" now has a new home in the Southern Tier!

Things keep evolving at Animal Adventure Park in Harpursville. Earlier this year, they welcomed many new animals including their second Bactrian camel calf. On a sad note, if you missed it, April the Giraffe was euthanized on April 2nd because of arthritis issues, just shy of her 21st birthday.

In honor of April and Azizi (April's calf), Animal Adventure Park recently built a memorial to honor them and they can't wait for you to see it. So what's new at the zoo...I mean at the park?

Animal Adventure Welcomes 'Murder Bird'

According to a post on the Animal Adventure Park Facebook page, the park is now housing the world's most dangerous bird - the Cassowary. "Kevin" is a young Cassowary and is yellow and brown and as he gets older, he'll have black plumage, red neck, and a large casque on his blue head.

This bird from Austrailia looks innocent enough to me but beware of its three-toed feet with sharp claws (one dagger-like) reaching over five inches. It's their claws and powerful legs that give them their intimidating title.

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Animal Adventure Park Owner, Jordan Patch calls them "murder birds" and they treat them with immense respect and caution when they are working around them. He also added that even though they are primarily a fruit eater, they are one scary bird.

You can observe their Cassowary (or as I call him "Danger Chicken') in the Aussie Outpost area.

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