Do you feel that? The air around us is a bit different than normal today. It's got that heavy feeling. I didn't think much about it until I was made aware of what is going on around us. I noticed on social media, some of my friends sharing pictures of a red sun and moon and not really thinking about why it was that way.

What that means is, it can cause short-term health effects. The NYS DEC mentions it as possible "irritation to the eyes, nose, and throat, coughing, sneezing, runny nose, and shortness of breath." The advisory is in effect until midnight. It's amazing to me how far and fast something like this can carry from one place on the planet to another through the air.

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Some of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation suggestions include staying indoors to reduce exposure, but if you must be outdoors, cuts down on strenuous activity. Pollution reducing tips from the NYS DEC include using fans to circulate air, close your blinds and shades, limit use of appliances, and avoid outdoor burning among other suggestions.

When it comes to air quality issues, it's best to play it safe. The NYS DEC asks that you also be aware of anyone who may be having issues including people with heart and/or breathing problems, young children and ofer adults.

via New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

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