Two residential buildings may be shut down by the city of Binghamton because of criminal activity and disturbances.

The owners of houses at 3 and 5 Sturges Street have been ordered to take action to address the problems associated with the properties.

According to Mayor Jared Kraham, Isaac Anzaroot, Alan Anzaroot and Craig Spencer have been sent lockdown letters indicating the properties have become a "public nuisance."

Police on Sturges Street on September 15, 2023. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
Police on Sturges Street on September 15, 2023. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
loading...

Kraham said police were called to 3 Sturges Street in September for a report of a man with an AK-47 assault rifle. A man was charged with weapon possession after police found a rifle and two loaded magazines when they searched the two-family house.

A man was shot in the chest last February at the single-family residence at 5 Sturges Street. A Binghamton man was charged with attempted murder in that incident.

Neighborhood residents watched police activity on Sturges Street on September 15, 2023. Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News
Neighborhood residents watched police activity on Sturges Street on September 15, 2023. Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News
loading...

The mayor said the owners of the properties will have ten days to meet with city officials to discuss the trouble that's occurred. If the owners don't submit corrective action plans, the city could go to court to obtain an order to lock down the properties for up to one year.

Neighbors last month told WNBF News they were getting "fed up" because of the ongoing problems involving guns and drugs at the houses.

The houses targeted in the city's lockdown warning are across the street from a residence where 12-year-old Cheri Lindsey was killed in March 1984. Broome County government acquired that property and tore down the abandoned house on the site in 2020.

A memorial garden was developed where the old building once stood.

VIDEO: Police swarmed Sturges Street after a reported shooting on September 15, 2023.

Enter your number to get our free mobile app

Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com. For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

LOOK: Controversial songs from the year you were born

Stacker celebrates history's most boundary-pushing—and thereby controversial—songs from 1930 through today.

Gallery Credit: Stacker

LOOK: Controversial songs from the year you were born

Stacker celebrates history's most boundary-pushing—and thereby controversial—songs from 1930 through today.

Gallery Credit: Stacker

The 40 Best Cover Songs by Rock Bands

 

More From 99.1 The Whale